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Monday, June 06, 2005

Caught and Embarrassed

Well I went to my sons room to let him off punishment, and he was playing this volleyball video game without any pant on. OR UNDERPANTS!!! He was playing with himself while playing a video game.

This video game has scantily clad buxom women in bathing suites playing volleyball. They were bouncing all over the place. I thought it was an action fighting game like the other ones I got him. I am not sure if I was more embarrassed catching him masturbating or realizing that he was left handed.

11 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is kind of off the subject, but what's the scoop about making wine at home? Do you do this?

11:20 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

It's "underwear", and how old is your son? Were you sexually aroused yourself? And probably the bigeest question is what IS the scoop about making wine at home?

12:01 AM  
Blogger Daniel_Bowen said...

It's probably perfectly natural for a kid his age. You are a bad mother, why don't you just hand over custody to someone who can handle the child, or go practice your hobby and shit in other cake.

12:19 AM  
Anonymous The Wine Guy said...

Equipment

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A lot of equipment you need for winemaking you are likely to have at your disposal already. But there is some specific winemaking equipment you'll need to acquire before starting to make your own wine. That's why you should locate a supplier near you (if you don't already have one).
I don't think I should tell you which equipment to buy, it all depends how serious you are going to take winemaking, or how much money you are willing to invest. There is always room to improvize. Articles that are printed bold I do advise you to consider purchasing before starting, if you haven't got them at your disposal already. I'll give some reasons why you might want to get a piece of equipment, so that you can decide by yourself.
This list may not cover anything you'll ever want, but I'm trying to be complete about basic equipment.
Whatever you decide to do, don't let copper, galvanize, iron or steel (except stainless) come in contact with your wine. The acids in the wine will react with these metals and create off-flavours or even make your wine poisonous! Also, use food grade plastics.
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Reusable winemaking equipment:

secondary fermentor
carboy, jug or another big bottle, 5l or bigger, use glass, not plastic, it's too porous, 2 bottles are easier for racking, you could use a bucket for racking though
air lock
to keep air and bugs out, you could use a plastic wrap with a rubber strap
bored rubber bung or cap
to put the fermentation lock onto the bottle neck
funnel
to fit a wine bottle, you need it with almost every event
bucket
to serve as a primary fermentor, to crush fruit in, or a safety precaution when fermenting
siphoning hose
about 2m long, 0.8-1 cm diameter
stirring spoon or stick
to dissolve sugar and other ingredients, also for pressing the cap
acid test kit
to check the acidity
bottle brush
a large one that can clean your carboys as well as wine bottles
kettle
to boil water or must for disinfection
primary fermentation vessel
sealable container for pulp fermentation like a big bucket, necessary for making red wine
sieve or mesh bag
to separate pulp from must, you could also use a pair of panty-hose
hydrometer
to measure S.G., to determine amount of sugar accurately
hydrometer jar
perceptible tube standing upright, to place a hydrometer in
siphon hose end
device that redirects the flow, thus not sucking up the sediment, can be used instead of a j-tube
teaspoons
2 for crushing campden tablets easily before dissolving
corking device
if you decide to use wine bottles, without it, you won't get those corks inserted properly
vinometer
for roughly determining the alcohol content in finished dry wine
thermometer
one to check the temperature in the fermentation area, another to check the must temperature

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Consumable winemaking equipment:
campden tablets
to sterilise equipment and must
labels
to identify your bottled wines, easy to make some yourself, see the Label making chapter for more info
bottles
for storage, wine bottles preferably. You could use other bottles, but make sure they are made out of glass
citric acid
for must acid addition and to use with campden tablets when sterilising to increase effect. You could use lemon juice too.
corks
if you decide to use wine bottles
fining agents
if your wine refuses to clear

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Additives

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Below I've made a list of some substances that could be added to the wine. Those that are usually added to each wine are printed bold.
citric acid or lemon juice
for acid addition if necessary
pecto-enzyme
to prevent cloudy wine due to a pectine haze
sulphite
or campden tablets, to avoid spoilage, see the Sulphite chapter on this page for more info.
yeast nutrient
food for the yeast
potassium sorbate
to keep sweet wines from refermenting, doesn't kill the yeast, only inhibits growth, only use on stable clear just sweetened wines just before bottling

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Sulphite

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In winemaking, sulphite (SO2) is widely being used as sterilisation agent in must, wine (almost in every commercial wine) and on equipment . It also prevents wine getting oxidized (especially when racking) because the oxygen reacts with the SO2 instead of the wine. Further, it prevents malo-lactic fermentation, especially when the wine has been bottled.
It doesn't cause harm, unless used in large quantities. Winemakers try to keep sulphite levels low. A few people are allergic to sulphite. If you are, don't use SO2 in your wine.
Sulphite is available in two types: powder and tablets (campden tablets). It usually comes as the salt (potassium metabisulphite, K2S2O4). I use campden tablets of 0.5 grams a piece because there is no hassle weighing the fine powder on a very accurate weighing scale, especially when making small batches of wine. I use them for sterilising my must. For amounts see the table below.
For sterilising my equipment I use sulphite powder together with citric acid, as the powder is less expensive than tablets and the amount to use needn't be that accurately determined.
Less sulphite is needed in a more acid environment (must or sterilising solution) to be equally effective. That's why you might consider adding some citric acid to you sterilising solution to increase effectiveness and using less sulphite in a more acid wine.
I use 1 crushed and dissolved campden tablet per 10 litres of must (0.5 g sulphite) while mixing the ingredients. When racking, I use the same amount. The second time again 1 tablet and just before bottling the last time.
Summarising this:

An example of SO2 use in wine
Step in winemaking Number of campden tablets per 10 litres Equivalent grams of sulphite per litre
Must preparation 1 0.05
First racking 1 0.05
Second racking 1 0.05
Bottling 1 0.05
TOTAL 4 0.20


I also sterilise my equipment by rinsing it in a sulphite solution just before use. In making 1 wine bottle full of sterilising solution I use about:
1 teaspoon sulphite powder (about 2 grammes)
1/2 teaspoon citric acid
0.75 litres water
There are other methods to fend off wine spoiling micro-organisms, like boiling (must and/or equipment)or rinsing with a chlorine solution (bleach). When using bleach, rinse equipment well after treatment with a lot of water. Use it only on equipment, NOT in must.
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Winemaker's log

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A winemaker's log is necessary for recalling events and evaluating the fermenting process. This way you can learn from your mistakes and successes, and eventually become a better winemaker.
Your winemaker's log could contain:
Type of wine
Ingredients/quantities
Dates of all events
Sugar additions
Hydrometer readings
Sugar-alcohol calculations
Racking dates
Acid contents/corrections
Alcohol content
Bottling date
Number of bottles
Results of opened bottles
Notes
It's better for it to contain excess information instead of too little so make a record of everything.
You can use a piece of paper, which you attach to the carboy. Also wordprocessors or spreadspeet programs can be used. Even specific winemaking record keeping programs have been developed for this purpose.
Below is a simple example of what a winemaker's record might look like.

Example
Apple wine 1
Date Remarks
1 2 1998 Must prepared, 800 g sugar added to SG 1080, 1 campden tablet added, total 5.5 liters of must.
2 2 1998 Champagne yeast rehydrated and added
4 2 1998 Slow start of fermentation
5 2 1998 Vigourous fermentation now
1 3 1998 SG 1010, 100g sugar added, carboy topped off with the sugar/water mixture
13 3 1998 SG 1003, 100g sugar added
10 4 1998 No bubbles any more, SG=1000
13 4 1998 First racking, 1 campden tablet added
21 4 1998 Second racking, 1 campden tablet added
3 5 1998 SG 998, Bottled, 1 campden tablet added, SG=998, alcohol content=11%vol

http://www.geocities.com/mipeman/info.html

9:31 AM  
Blogger Mom said...

Questions:
It's "underwear", and how old is your son? Were you sexually aroused yourself? And probably the bigeest question is what IS the scoop about making wine at home?

Answers:
1. Underwear pertains to all clothes worn next to the skin or beneath your outer clothing. Hence thermals “aka long johns” can be underwear – I just put underpants, to be more specific because he still had on a T shirt.
2. No I was not.
3. Wine? No, I only buy but my wines. How did you get to my blog? But if you make wine make sure you use copper, galvanize, or iron containers. The acids in the wine will react with these metals and create off-flavors or even make your wine poisonous! So drink up! (this was also a response to #2)

My Question:
I thought only feminine men or alcoholics used the phrase “what’s the scoop”? Oh sorry, I just answered my own question.

10:16 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Mom,

1. You originally had "UNDERWARE" on your site, which was misspellt. Not very forthright to edit it and then argue you were right all along. I'd say you need to concentrate on your therapy, trying being more honest with yourself, and others.

3. How did I get to your blog??? My dear woman, this is the internet - there are millions, if not billions of people using it everyday and search engines and god knows what else "spider" the web to harvest links and email addresses. This helps search engines search better, and spammers spam better. Therefore you are likely to get visitors from all over the world reading your therapy here.

As to an answer to your question, if you honestly only attribute that phrase to those characteristics then you should either get better at insults, or get out of your little town more often. Try any newsroom in the country. Also, the phrase was originally used by another anonymous, not myself.

My question for you is - do you and your therapist really believe that airing your dirty laundry for the whole world to read is a healthy way to deal with your problems? Seems to me to be nothing more than an attempt to gain attention to yourself.

7:52 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You seen the therapist anom ? She looks 60s lesbian hippy to me.

7:56 PM  
Anonymous Max said...

Yeah you had "UNDERWARE" on your site - You got caught!

11:19 PM  
Anonymous Max said...

...but guy you were lookin for wine and you got to a soccer mom page - use a search engine BABY!

or use this for help

http://www.google.com/search?q=wine

11:23 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

For christ sakes Max, fuck off would ya.

1:57 AM  
Anonymous Emerson said...

Hey, has your son ever caught you doing the dirty?

9:19 PM  

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